26 November 2006

Drunk Enough To Say I Love You?

Here's another question for you. What's the female equivalent of masterclass?

Caryl Churchill's play (can't we make her a Dame without going through the cretinous royals?) is a stunning, steely, biting piece. The tension between who she is and who they are, Jack and Sam, her creations. The fearless imagination. I don't know what else to say for now because it's still sinking in. Need to read it now.

But as a work of theatre, a thing to listen to and look at, it's sublime. Mesmeric. Very good work by James Macdonald in realising the text, letting it speak for itself, framing it, elucidating.

Some great rehearsal photos here, featuring Herself.

Bumped into one of my Friends In The North at the play, visiting family down South - fancy that! (Actually it's not much of a staggerer, she's a 'theatre worker'.)

7 comments:

lancewrite said...

I saw it during previews and I'm still trying to work out what was happening. I like the way it has upset critics (positively & negatively). Coveney (whatsonstage.com) said he read the play twice before writing his review (and raving about the play).

sbs said...

Cheers Lance. Know what you mean about the critics - thanks for pointing me to the whatsonstage round-up - re the negative there's a certain austere intelligence about the play that gets the goat of men of a certain age and of a certain certainty about their own view of the world, especially when displayed by a woman.

sbs said...

By the way still gobsmacked by de Jongh and I agree with every word. Who knew?

Glyn said...

Bet you she's refused a damehood more than once...

sbs said...

Yes I'm sure you're right. It stinks that our public honours are offered with that association. A horrid tribe they are. They surely think the same of us!

City Slicker said...

Pleased to hera you enjoyed it.

Strange how Churchill seems to represent a gulf between those involved in theatre and those who enjoy going to it?

I have spoken with many people since I saw Drunk Enough and not one rated it.

I was so disappointed after montsh of anticiaption. But you can't please all the people, now can you?

sbs said...

I did enjoy it, as far as you can enjoy so black a piece. I admired its concision, and the dislocation between what's said (the obscene history) and what's seen (two quite ordinary lovers). As for a gulf between those who make theatre and those who enjoy going to it, I don't see that. It may be true that playwrights in particular are in awe at her talent, her ability to reinvent herself, her restless enquiry. It doesn't mean though that we leave our critical faculties at the cloakroom.

ps. I nearly forgot - my Friend In The North (not a writer) didn't like it!